The "ME-1 Mill Engine"
           
       
    Bore: .375"  Stroke: .750"  Flywheel Dia.: 2.000"

Although the ME-1 Mill Engine follows no particular prototype, it is typical of many horizontal type engines which powered the industrial revolution.  Features of the model include non-split bearing stands, a "T" shaped crosshead and a traditional sliding "D" type valve. Since all 30+ components are fabricated from bar stock, the project is quite forgiving in that no replacement castings are needed if you aren't happy with a particular part.

The finished size of apprx. 9" L x 3 1/2" W x 2 1/2" H  makes it very suitable for the home shop machinist as most components can be successfully machined on a "benchtop" lathe and mill. Recommended equipment includes a lathe with 3" or greater swing, both 3 and 4 jaw chucks, a vertical mill, and a 4" or larger rotary table.

Though not a beginners project, the Mill Engine's design with discreet components mounted to a solid base makes it a little more forgiving in terms of alignment upon final assembly.

With reasonable care in machining and assembly, this engine will run beautifully on 5-10 psi of compressed air and the contrast of the various metals all working in synchronization through the crankshaft-crosshead-piston assembly, and at the same time the eccentric-link rods-valve assembly makes for quite a conversation piece, and hours of satisfaction in just watching this little engine run.

Whether you simply polish the parts or add some color with your own paint scheme....leave the base "as is" or add a decorative edge...or even mount the engine on a finished hardwood base...it still becomes a unique result of your own craftsmanship for years to come.

For a listing of material and fastener requirements click here. Matls./Fasteners

The plan set consists of 11 pages of drawings and 4 pages of construction notes for $12.00 (US postage paid).

To view or download a video clip of this engine running, click on the "Video" button below. (8.2MB, apprx. 46 seconds, .wmv format)

 

 
    Back To Engines Page        Home         Video